Harmonic Response Load

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  • Last Post 29 November 2018
masud407 posted this 05 October 2018

Hello Peter,

 

I have a basic inquiry regarding harmonic response analysis in ANSYS. When we provide a magnitude of acceleration/displacement in any particular direction (X/Y/Z), does it mean a sinusoidal input or a step input?

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kiarashniroumand posted this 29 November 2018

Hello Peter

i have a problem in applying force in a harmonic response simulation

the simulation is based on frequency response of a cantilever beam which has a fan on it that vibrates because of an unbalanced mass

as you know an unbalanced mass produces a force like this F=(m*e*w^2)sin(w*time) where w is the excitation frequency

 

the problem is in amplitude of the harmonic force , it is varying with frequency by a second order equation

as i wanna get the frequency response deformation , it becomes important to define the frequency varying amplitude

but in workbench 18.2 there is no choice to apply amplitude as a function of frequency , it has just constant and tabular data choice

the tabular data can be varying by frequency simply , but it is so hard to define the load like this below

frequency=1 hz , z component force=1

frequency=2 hz , z component force=4

frequency=3 hz , z component force=9

frequency=4 hz , z component force=16

...

...

frequency=2000 hz , z component force=4000000

 

is there any way to define it easily by a function and expression ?

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peteroznewman posted this 05 October 2018

Hello,

Your original Discussion got too long, so I moved your new question here.

A load in a harmonic response analysis is a sinusoidal input of the amplitude of the sine function.

Regards,

Peter

peteroznewman posted this 29 November 2018

Hello k,

Use Excel. In column A, put 1, 2, 3... 2000 and in column B put the equation you want: A*A for example.
Copy the 2000 rows x 2 column cells and paste into the Tabular Data window in Workbench.

That's pretty easy right?

Regards,
Peter

P.S. It's better to start a New Discussion because then you "own" the discussion and get notified of replies.

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