How to plot pressure drop and wall shear results along the length of a helical coil pipe

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  • Last Post 21 March 2018
Bern Certeza posted this 19 March 2018

Hi everyone,

Could anyone please teach me on how I can plot the pressure drop and wall shear along the length of a helical coil pipe in an XY-plot? Thank you in advance.

Bern

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peteroznewman posted this 20 March 2018

In Fluent there is a Surface Integrals calculator to integrate the Wall Shear Stress on a wall.

This is the total for the entire surface area of the helical coil.

Do you require to plot shear stress as a function of the length of the coil?

Bern Certeza posted this 20 March 2018

Hi peteroznewman,

Yes, I need to plot the shear stress as a function of the length of the coil. My output should look like an X-Y plot with the coil length in the x-axis and the shear stress stress in the y-axis. I cannot seem to do that, maybe because my geometry is 3D. Is there any way for me to do this?

Thanks in advance.

Bern

peteroznewman posted this 20 March 2018

Hi Bern,

If you need 20 points on your X axis, you could create 19 planes along the length of the helix to cut the surface into 20 pieces and use the Surface Integral calculator 20 times to get the Y axis values. How many turns are in your coil? What is the helix angle? Perhaps you only need 6 planes to make 12 pieces per turn.

I hope one of the CFD-expert members will post a better solution.

Regards,
Peter

Bern Certeza posted this 21 March 2018

Hi Peter,

I have uploaded the dimensions of my coiled tubing in this message. Could you help me in figuring out how to create a number of different planes from my geometry?

Thank you.

Regards,

Bern 

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peteroznewman posted this 21 March 2018

Hi Bern,

I am not a CFD expert and perhaps one of those experts will offer their opinion, but I will give you my suggestion. 

Read the Wikipedia page on Entrance Length.  Have you calculated the Reynolds number for this problem?

The wall shear is going to be constant along the entire length of the pipe after the entrance length. You could to slice the pipe into a few divisions along the entrance length until the flow fully develops into a constant wall shear.

Regards,

Peter

Bern Certeza posted this 21 March 2018

Hi Peter,

I haven't thought about the concept of hydrodynamic entry length and how it can potentially simplify my results visualization problem. Thank you very much for giving me a good insight. I'll try doing what you have said in my model.

Thanks a lot!

Regards,

Bern

peteroznewman posted this 21 March 2018

Hi Bern,

Glad to help. You can show your appreciation by clicking "Like" on the posts that are helpful.

Regards,

Peter

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