LASER HEAT SOURCE MOVEMENT IN NON LINEAR PATHS

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Hemnath posted this 08 January 2019

Hello,

I am working in the field of laser additive manufacturing and using ANSYS APDL for simulating the process. But I need help regarding the movement of laser source in a non linear path like circular or in some curvature. Could you please help me out in this regard?

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jj77 posted this 08 January 2019

There is an act extension (not sure if you can get this, or if it is free to students), that has a moving heat source. Please see the link for more information:

https://www.simutechgroup.com/tips-and-tricks/ansys-application-customization-toolkit-articles/423-ansys-act-moving-heat-source

 

Also there might have been some posts related to this so you might want to search the forum. E.g., see this which is very similar to your question: https://studentcommunity.ansys.com/thread/moving-heat-load-in-ansys-apdl/?order=all#comment-c5efcf1d-3d29-4b5c-9ae5-a9c2012d15fb

 

In any way it should be possible, I have never done this though in ANSYS, only in Strand7 where there is a moving load module (both force  and heat), used for the design of bridges. Also in ABAQUS some researches/engineers have used the UMAT, DFLUX to implement this, there are some subroutines which one can have a look at and get an idea how this is done (written in Fortran). Not sure if there is a similar one in ANSYS.

So there are different options. Basically I suppose you want to run and stop (use restarts) moving your laser spot to the next location (find nearest node to apply temperatures to), and continue doing that in a transient heat analysis until you have travelled the path you need. With some apdl scripting it should be possible. Perhaps some other students have some advice or scripts that could get you started.

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SandeepMedikonda posted this 08 January 2019

Hemnath,

Additive modeling in WB uses a lumped layer approach and relies on the EKILL and EALIVE commands along with the assumption that a whole layer of elements are bought into the simulation at the melting temperature of the material. Particularly helpful if you are building the whole part. Refer to the AM Commands in the help.

The above-suggested method by Jason and the ACT referred to can be used in a transient thermal simulation for applying the load. However, the path of the laser cannot be accounted for in a workbench additive case as the lumped layer method accounts for multiple deposition layers at once.

Regards,
Sandeep
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Hemnath posted this 09 January 2019

Jason sir,

Thanks a lot for your help. I will look into it and revert you back.

Hemnath posted this 09 January 2019

Sandeep sir,

Firstly, I would like to know how can i get an ACT extension as our institute has license for ANSYS alone. 

Second thing is I am able to simulate the laser source in a linear path using APDL codes but could you suggest how to move it in a curvature using APDL codes?

Thanks in advance

Hemnath. 

SandeepMedikonda posted this 09 January 2019

Hemnath,

Are you registered on the App store...if so it should be available to you free of charge.

In case you are not registered. Reach out to your ANSYS Account Manager/Ansys Support Coordinator at your university. They should be able to get you the app.

The ACT extension comes with the source code (not a binary format) so you can refer to the APDL commands in there. Using these you should be able to define a curvature.

Regards,
Sandeep
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shekhars posted this 4 weeks ago

To interpolate the heat source in a curve or circular path. Using APDL code, the way it is performed for straight-line deposition using a cartesian coordinate system, similarly it is performed for curves using a user-defined cylindrical coordinate system. Provided, you have to convert and put the coordinates according to your interpolation path.

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